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Deer & deer parks of Lincolnshire by Chris J. Manning

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Published by Lincolnshire Naturalist Union in Horncastle, Lincolnshire .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliography and references : p. 91-94.

StatementChris J. Manning
ContributionsLincolnshire Naturalists" Union
The Physical Object
Pagination94 p., [8] :
Number of Pages94
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL26497419M
ISBN 100948005076
ISBN 109780948005077

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You are browsing: All Deer and Deer Parks of Lincolnshire. Foyalty Deer and Deer Parks of Lincolnshire (Paperback) Christopher John Manning. £ Usually despatched within 3 weeks. Add to Basket. Synopsis. Leave Review. For more information please visit the A Year of Books page.   Buy Deer and Deer Parks of Lincolnshire by Manning, Christopher John (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Christopher John Manning. Deer and Deer Parks of Lincolnshire Current and historic details of Lincolnshire’s deer, focusing on their landscape impact, particularly the creation and maintenance of parks. Exisiting deer parks are covered in separate concluding chapters, then three indices on general matters, parks, paddocks and zoological gardens in Great Britain and Ireland plus owners of parks etc holding deer. First edition of , pages, illustrated with + b/w photos including frontis, plus three diagrams/sketches.

  This is an odd book, a history of deer parks by a deer enthusiast and expert, transcending just deer. Deer parks were necessarily large and keeping them wild enough for deer and large enough meant political power. Such places were for royals or the gentry at s: 5. The story of these Lincolnshire fallow deer begins after their Norman introduction (Lister, ) and is closely linked to Forests and Parks, land management practises that came to prominence in Medieval England. Kesteven Forest – The Forest of Kesteven had been disbanded c, since when the fortunes of the deer has depended on parks. Deer & Deer Parks of Lincolnshire £ by Chris J Manning Current and historic details of Lincolnshire’s deer, focusing on their landscape impact, particularly the creation and maintenance of parks. The Deer Park. Whilst there was a licence to empark deer granted to the owners of the estate in , the earliest reference to the Deer Park is described by Evelyn Shirley in his book Deer and Deer Parks published in as follows: “Within the ancient forest now called the Vale of Blackmore or Blakemore, is Stock, where William de Cantilupe is recognised as the possessor of a park in the.

‘The Deer Parks of Domesday Book.’ Landscapes ; 4(1), 10 Following the Norman conquest in the rape of Arundel continued to the Hampshire border. By the rape had been sub-divided and the rape of Chichester was created. 11 Clough, M. (ed.), Op. Cit. p. The great and small parks in Arundel, Badworth, Bignor, Cocking. Deer parks flourished and proliferated under the Normans, forming a forerunner of the deer parks that became popular among England's landed gentry. The Domesday Book of records thirty-six of them. Initially the Norman kings maintained an exclusive right to . Roe Deer are relatively small with a shoulder height of cm, male antlers are short with up to 6 points and erect. Their coat is golden red in summer but darkens to dark brown in the winter with a conspicuous white rump, Roe Deer have no tail. Fallow Deer (Dama dama) – The most common of Lincolnshire’s deer. Fallow deer can be easily. Deer & Deer Parks of Lincolnshire Presents historic details of Lincolnshire's deer, focusing on their landscape impact particularly the creation and maintenance of parks. This work includes a Gazetteer of the county's parks.